• Miri M

How to fix a stretched T-shirt neckline - extend the life of what you already own

Using this very simple trick and basic materials, anyone can fix their over-stretched cotton T-shirt neckline and enjoy wearing it again. It is so simple you would wonder why I even bothered to write about it.


Exactly! It is so simple that I fixed it from flab to fab in less than 30min while enjoying TV, so can you!


How to fix it?

1. Get matching embroidery threads in shades that you like. You can use contrasting colours to give it extra fun.

2. You can use normal sewing threads, and use single thread if you don't wanna show the stitches.

3. Sew single stitches around the neckline, tighten just enough to make the neckline smooth again, you will need to do at least 2 or 3 rows, depending on the size of your T-shirt neckline.

4. Remember after you add the running stitch, the neckline won't be stretchable - so if the T-shirt neckline is small, you will need to use elastic thread for this purpose. My T-shirt has a wide neckline so I can still pull it down my big head without distorting my face too much.

Here are a few pictures of ideas that we can fix our clothings quickly to extend their use:


My daughter's tank top has food stains (like all her every other clothes) - I embroidered stitches to cover them up.


A pair of PJ pants that my little one loves but the elastic was gone. I replaced with the middle section of her old ballet leotard that was too small to wear. The bottom of the leotard was made into a pair of panties.


I repurposed my husband's worn out shirt into a skirt for my older daughter.


The best fashion is fashion that lasts, the best clothings are those that create the least impact to the environment. Let's start by fixing and repurposing what we already own.


Since you are here already, my friend. Please give me approximately less than a few minutes more.

Let me share a little more thoughts......



Do we really need that many pieces of garments?


Every year the world as a whole consumes more than 80 billion items of clothing.

The amount of new garments bought by the First World countries have tripled since the 1960s. This exponential increase causes the need for more resources, and the need for a speedier process from which clothes are produced.


In all aspects, the textile industry contribute to differing forms of environmental pollution - water, air, and soil. The textile industry is the second greatest polluter of local freshwater in the world. Some of the main factors that contribute to this industrial caused pollution are the vast overproduction of fashion items, the use of synthetic fibres, and the agriculture pollution of fashion crops...... Source: Wikipedia


Every time we wash clothes with synthetic fibres we release thousands of micro-fibre into the sewage that are too small to be treated. These microfibre from fleece, polyester, nylon, acrylic, spandex, rayon, acetate...... and basically all mixed fibres from clothings from most fast fashion stores, end up in our ocean, consumed by sea creatures and stay in our food chain forever.


Kon-mari-ing might give you more closet space, but does it really help?


This question goes back to the fundamental idea of consumerism:

Consumerism is a social and economic order that encourages an acquisition of goods and services in ever-increasing amounts. With the industrial revolution, but particularly in the 20th century, mass production led to overproduction—the supply of goods would grow beyond consumer demand, and so manufacturers turned to planned obsolescence and advertising to manipulate consumer spending. (Source: Wikipedia)


Yes I think we are all manipulated

To the point that we tend to judge others by what they wear, what expensive items they have. We have been influenced to measure our happiness & success by how much we can spend, how fashionable we look, how fast we are able to follow the trends, how many expensive items we are able to buy/accumulate in our home. Special occasions seem more special because we are able to gift our loved ones that expensive watch, limited edition item, exclusive designer bag - the competition and pressure to buy is just endless.


What happens then? STUFF. Just STUFF.

One day we find that our things/clothes/gadgets/toys/bags/kitchenware are overwhelming our physical space, our mental space is burdened because we have to deal with those stuff, while our credit card debts pile up. As our closets and space get filled up with stuff that get dusty & mouldy (very bad for health), the things that used to look shiny and attractive to us, no longer spark joy.


Next, we Kon-Marie them, sort them out, throw out, donate, recycle, fold them nicely into squares, we'll feel all good again......Right? Right? Shifu?


No. This cycle just repeats, if we are not able to get out of consumerism and start to feel fulfilled without buying the next shiny new stuff.


I too, sometimes wish for the chance to go shopping, Oooh... the burst of good feelings from caressing the fine fabrics, and Oooh...the beautiful sight and sounds of shops, the smells of brand new leather bags...... hm... and the sense of feeling alive with possibilities, how I could look more attractive wearing those new pretty garments with perfect cutting that can make me look slender and sexy......


OK! That's enough. YOU! ARE! ENOUGH! SISTA!

Maybe, before we buy the next garment, let's reuse, repurpose, refashion, relove, rethink what we already own, and feel contented about what we have and who we are without the need to consume more?


Maybe, if we are able to take a step back and be conscious of our thoughts and behavior, we might find that who we already are, what we already own are better than what's in the shops?


Thank you so much for staying with me, reading something that you have probably heard 1000 times already.


Remember, "You Are Enough". You don't need more things to feel more fulfilled and attractive.

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